FloraBorg Community Update: 3 IndaPlants Up And Running

The IndaPlant Project: An Act Of Trans-Species Giving—originally beginning as a collaboration between the myself and the engineer Dr. Qingze Zou—is designed to facilitate the free movement and metabolic function of ordinary houseplants. In this effort, we have have successfully created a floraborg, a term we coined to describe an entity that is part plant and part robot. This work has recently led to the creation of a larger team which now includes the biologist Dr. Simeon Kotchoni and the computer scientist Dr. Ahmed Elgammal. Our group is currently working on the creation of a floraborg biocyber interface. Addressing the super sensory capacities of plants, this interface allows humans to decipher plant-based information on ecosystem health, the effects of climate change and air pollution. In this capacity, the IndaPlant may allow us to model and support environments that are able to sustain humans and plants alike. A video of the current project plant community can be viewed at  https://vimeo.com/90457796.

Detail of IndaPlant taken at Rutgers University, June 12, 2014.
Detail of IndaPlant taken at Rutgers University, June 12, 2014.

At the project’s inception, I initially intended to mount the plants on light-seeking Brattenberg vehicles. Originally created through a series of thought exercises by the Italian/Australian Cyberneticist Valentino Brattenberg, these simple vehicles utilize a basic schematic for attraction and avoidance. Once the IndaPlant team began considering the possibilities inherent in the creation of a floraborg however, we realized that we could instead wire the vehicle through an Arduino board. This current configuration not only allows for species-specific programming but also supports simple adaptive behavior, in the form of machine learning. The current IndaPlant community consists of three data-sharing, light-sensing, robotic vehicles, each of which can respond to the needs of a potted plant by moving it around in three-dimensional space in search of sunlight and water. The IndaPlant rides on a three-wheeled triangular carriage. An acrylic shell covers the unit’s base and internal components. Inside the unit’s housing, the Arduino microprocessor and three microcontrollers allow the floraborg to be programmed with the specific needs of the species that it supports. This housing provides a plant docking station at its apex and is externally sided with three solar panels, which the robot uses to re-charge its battery pack when the plant suns itself. Six sonar sensors, used for obstacle detection, are externally mounted the base of the unit.

The IThe IndaPlant Project: An Act Of Trans-Species Giving, Elizabeth Demaray and Dr. Qingze Zou, 2014, utilizes machine learning and robotics to facilitate the free movement and metabolic function of ordinary houseplants.ndaPlant Project: An Act Of Trans-Species Giving—originally beginning as a collaboration between the artist Elizabeth Demaray and the engineer Dr. Qingze Zou—is designed to facilitate the free movement and metabolic function of ordinary houseplants.
The IndaPlant Project: An Act Of Trans-Species Giving, Elizabeth Demaray and Dr. Qingze Zou, 2014, utilizes machine learning and robotics to facilitate the free movement and metabolic function of ordinary houseplants.

As an interactive art installation, the IndaPlant Project was created to be shown in a public exhibition space. The artwork is currently housed in the Engineering Department at Rutgers, where the floraborgs have become part of the daily routine. When Dr. Zou’s comes to work in the morning he is greeted by the three IndaPlants, which jostle with one another to exit his office in search of sun in the adjacent hallway. When an IndaPlant is thirsty, a moisture sensor sends a signal through the unit’s central processor which may decide that its plant species needs water. If so, the unit will locate a water dispenser in the hallway, via an inferred sensor. If a floraborg is in the immediate vicinity of the watering station, passer-buys are invited to give the plant a drink. IndaPlant Project status updates and current videos can be seen at elizbethdemaray.org.

The IndaPlant Project: An Act of Trans-Species Giving

The IndaPlant Project: An Act of Trans-Species Giving. This is the first test run for the first ever floraborg.

Our first IndaPlant, a robotic support that allows houseplants to freely seek sunlight and water, is up and running. The work debuted this week at the Secret Life of Plants Symposium at Princeton University, will debut as a solo show at CAMAC this month and will be presented at the 2013 International Symposium on Electronic Art in three weeks. If you are in Sydney, please join us! http://www.isea2013.org.

In advance of the opening at CAMAC, I posted a rough video short of the project titled IndaPlant Project: An Act of Trans-Species Giving, on vimeo: https://vimeo.com/65444659 last week. The video describes the making of the first IndaPlant, shows the initial floraborg test run and describes the multiple stages of the project.

Once the video was posted, Christopher Mims wrote a lovely article about the project on Quartz http://qz.com/82541/robotic-exoskeleton-turns-houseplants-into-drones/. That story was apparently picked up by the Daily Mail in the UK which ran it as their lead science and technology story (with a great picture of a wilted potted plant) on Monday, May 13th, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2321914/Plant-bot-worlds-robot-turns-household-plants-light-seeking-drones.html.

Just now, as I was about to write this post, I did a fast Google search on the project and first found, on French YouTube, part of the video with no voice over and some sort of ominous dance music: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0A9g_k7KAkc. It had two hundred hits (!) If any of you know French–please let me know what the write up says.

I then proceeded to find on Google five pages of posts/articles and blogs about the project in many languages. So, if any of you can read any of these posts, let me know what you think. Cheers, Eliz

In Spanish: http://mrcitech.blogspot.fr/2013/05/robot-indaplant-mantiene-plantas-cerca.html

http://es.gizmodo.com/indaplant-el-vehiculo-autonomo-arduino-para-ficus-con-500417824

http://www.chw.net/2013/05/conoce-a-indaplant-el-dispositivo-que-convierte-las-plantas-en-robots/

http://www.pcdemano.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article

http://www.frontera.info/EdicionEnLinea/Notas/CienciayTecnologia/09052013/701422-Mantiene-robot-a-plantas-cerca-de-luz-solar.aspx

http://www.robotikka.com/13920/robot-mantiene-plantas-cerca-de-la-luz-del-sol/

In French: http://fr.500gadgets.com/page/meet-indaplant-device-that-turns-plants-into-robots.html

In English: http://nexttruth.com/?p=9526

http://www.extremetech.com/author/jplafke

http://news.discovery.com/tech/robotics/exoskeleton-helps-plant-find-sun-and-water-130514.htm

Chinese/English: http://biweekly.isvoc.com/category/indaplant

http://tech.sina.com.cn/d/2013-05-15/10098341846.shtml

http://post.discovery.tom.com/s/060009316086.html

http://firefox.huanqiu.com/tech/discovery/2013-05/3937696.html

http://scitech.people.com.cn/BIG5/n/2013/0516/c1007-21504013.html

http://www.cunbox.com/news/kj/kxts/2013/0516/49324.html

http://news.cnyes.com/Content/20130515/KH7W0XEN9NY5A.shtml?c=headline_sitehead